Minearl seeking expedition
Cheryl & Richard Sittinger
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Minearl seeking expedition
Cheryl & Richard Sittinger chat with mine geologist Dean Misantori during our tour of the Sweet Home Mine, Alma, Colorado, September '97, when we featured Sweet Home rhodochrosite in our Mineral of the Month Club

Hello, and thanks for visiting our Web site!

Our names are Richard & Cheryl Sittinger, and for the last fifteen years, we've been sending excellent quality mineral specimens and fascinating, in-depth write-ups to our Mineral of the Month Club members. Now we'd like to invite you to join our Club!

We believe you'll find our Club is a great way to obtain an excellent specimen at a low price. We purchase more than 500 specimens of each mineral we feature, and as a result get some wonderful bargains on outstanding minerals. Club members have commented time and time again about how much more minerals we feature typically sell for at shows! Plus, shipping is included in the United States, saving you more money! And you'll be amazed by the depth of the mineral write-ups and by how much you'll learn from reading them! Click here to view a sample write-up

We have three levels of membership available-- with the only difference being the size and price of the specimens. Click here to see how our Club works

Click here to give a gift membership 
Click here to renew a previous gift membership

Gift certificates are available now! Click here for more info on Gift Certificates

JOIN NOW!

Note to Club members wanting to renew: Click here for our new renewal page: Club Member Renewal

Email us with any questions or call us toll free at 1-800-941-5594! 

Remember, you'll receive only the minerals you wish-- you can pass on any mineral at any time. Our goal is to provide you with wonderful specimens and highly informative, detailed write-ups that will increase your love and appreciation for our natural world!

NEW FOR CLUB MEMBERS: RECEIVE YOUR MONTHLY MINERAL WRITE-UP, NEWSLETTER, AND OFFER SHEET AS PDF FILES VIA E-MAIL BY CLICKING HERE: Please send my write-ups, etc, as pdf files via E-mail

OUR PLATINUM MEMBERSHIP!

Since we purchase over 600 of each monthly featured mineral for our Club members, we are often able to obtain high quality specimens at bargain prices, and then pass the savings along to our members. For more details about this new membership, click this link:  Platinum Membership     

E-mails from new members:

"I received my [Platinum-level] piece yesterday. An outstanding sample, I am very pleased. Thanks."


"I absolutely love being a member. My husband got me the membership as an anniversary gift. The minerals are stunning and I am learning a lot."

"I got my July mineral and found it very interesting. You send a really comprehensive report on the minerals; it's fantastic. Thanks."

"I am so excited. So far I am very impressed with your club. I have not done anything yet, but it seems like we have such a personal relationship, not at all what I expected. Thank you!"


"As I have said before, the relationship we have made with your organization has been such a positive experience for our grandson. Andrew has been with your group, as a Silver member, since he was four and a half years old; he is still thrilled with his collection and with his monthly additions. Just last week Andrew made a presentation to his second grade class about his knowledge of rocks and minerals. Thank you again for this opportunity to continue with you on e-mail. We look forward to the consistent excellent connection."

Free Pocketsize DK Rocks & Minerals Book for each new member! ($7 value)

Our privacy policy: We will never under any circumstances give or sell Club member's addresses and other personal information to anyone! We loathe this practice and will never engage in it!

WHY NOT JOIN NOW!

Platinum-level specimens-- Click here to see  photos of Platinum-level specimens: Platinum Membership

 

Would you like to start your membership with January's mineral and include all the minerals we've featured so far this year? Then choose one of these memberships:

1 Year Gold-Level membership starting with January 2011 for $291.50 (12 months for the price of 11)

1 Year Silver-Level membership starting with January 2011 for $88 (12 months for the price of 11)

Click here to join now or to give a gift membership, including a complimentary gift card with your special message:

WHY NOT JOIN NOW!

STILL AVAILABLE: APRIL 2011 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: KYANITE

Kyanite
Capelinha Mine
Jequitinhonha Valley
Minas Gerais, Brazil

APRIL 2011 KYANITE from Brazil. Our kyanite specimens were collected at the Capelinha Mine near Capelinha in the Jequitinhonha Valley in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais, which is one of the world’s premier sources of mineral crystals and gemstones. Our specimens were obtained as a by-product of mining pegmatite gemstones. In the early Paleozoic Era some 490 million years ago, the present-day surface of Minas Gerais was buried to a depth of about 12,000 feet. The basement rock, which consisted of highly metamorphosed gneiss, schist, and quartzite, was intruded by granitic magma that created gemstone-bearing pegmatites and provided the pressures that formed our kyanite crystals in the adjacent schist. Capelinha has three pegmatite gemstone mines, the Capelinha, Campo do Boa and Fazenda Rubin Pimenta mines, which are worked by both open-pit and underground methods. These mines yield crystals of topaz, titanite, and the tourmaline mineral elbaite. In their search for gemstones, pegmatite miners remove large quantities of surrounding schist, which sometimes contains well-developed, blue kyanite crystals. This is just a portion of what you will read in this month's write-up!

STILL AVAILABLE: MARCH 2011 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: AXINITE-(FE)

Axinite-(Fe)
New Melones Dam
Calaveras County, California

MARCH 2011 AXINITE-(FE) from California. The September-October 1982 issue of the Mineralogical Record contained an article on a new find, stating: "In the fall of 1981, very fine Ferroaxinite specimens were collected from the spillway adjacent to New Melones Lake near Copperopolis in Calaveras county. Since its discovery, this locality has produced some of the finest ferroaxinite specimens ever found in North America." We are delighted to have obtained a nice lot from this find! (The name of the mineral has been changed from Ferroaxinite to Axinite-(Fe) in the intervening years.) Gold-level specimens are much smaller than usual--small crystals on small matrix, most about 1" to 2". We're mounting the smaller pieces on the Acrylic squares we offer, which makes then much showier.

STILL AVAILABLE: JULY 2010 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: QUARTZ (JASPER) AFTER ARAGONITE

Quartz variety Jasper Pseudomorph after Aragonite
Valle de las Plumas
Paso de Indio
Chubut Province
Argentina

July 2010. Pseudomorphs of quartz after aragonite from Argentina, another unusual find! The outside crystal form is that of aragonite, but the original mineral has been completely replaced by the Jasper variety of chalcedonic quartz! The corresponding write-up explains exactly how and why this type of replacement occurs in nature in a special section entitled "The Phenomenon of Mineral Pseudomorphism." You'll find both the mineral and the write-up quite fascinating! And Platinum-level member have the opportunity to obtain a piece that has been cut in half and polished to show off the inner beauty of the jasper and the drusy quartz lined pockets! Follow this link for details: Click here for details on Platinum Membership

Pyrite Concretion
Hengyang Baifang Coal Mines
Hengyang County
Hengyang Prefecture
Hunan Province, China

Pyrite is one of those amazing minerals that continues to come out of the ground in unusual forms and shapes! Our specimens are from a new find in China, where the pyrite crystallized in unusual spherical and ovoidal concretions, some of which look like acorns, muffin tops, turtle shells, brains, and snowmen! The accompanying write-up explains in depth how pyrite crystallizes in such odd shapes in the section on "About Our Specimens" and in the special section on "The Many Forms of Pyrite." You'll find the concretion and the write-up quite fascinating!

Gold-level specimens are complete concretions about 2.5" by 2"

Silver-level specimens consists of half a concretion, allowing you to really see the radiating crystal structure

Platinum-level specimens are bigger and heavier--click here to see what they look like: Click here to see Platinum-level specimens

Would you like to order all 24 minerals we've featured in 2006 and 2007? Click here to see photos of all 12 minerals from 2006: 2006 Minerals or Order here:

All 24 minerals from 2006 and 2007 in Silver-size for $160--24 minerals for the price of 20! Price includes US shipping.

All 24 featured minerals from 2006 and 2007 in Gold-Level size for $530--24  minerals for the price of 20! Price includes US shipping.

All 24 featured minerals from 2006 and 2007 in Platinum size--Larger, better specimens--24 for the price of 20--Email us for price: All 24 Platinum-Size Minerals from 2006 & 2007  Price includes US shipping.

STILL AVAILABLE: SEPTEMBER 2010 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: HEMATITE PSEUDOMORPH AFTER MAGNETITE

Hematite after Magnetite, Payún Volcano, Altiplano de Payún Matru, Mendoza, Argentina. Two photos showing two of the habits we have on hand for Club members!

September 2010 Hematite after Aragonite, Payún Volcano, Altiplano de Payún Matru, Mendoza, Argentina. Another amazing pseudomorph from Argentina, and one that has generated tremendous interest in the mineral community! Our pseudomorphic specimens were collected at an extinct Argentinean volcano. Our write-up explains their unusual fumarolic origin, the chemical oxidation of magnetite into hematite, and some of the basics behind the phenomenon of volcanism.

STILL AVAILABLE: AUGUST 2010 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: VESUVIANITE

Vesuvianite
Jeffrey Mine
Quebec
Canada

August 2010 Vesuvianite, Jeffrey Mine, Quebec, Canada. Though the specimens we're sending this month are much smaller than usual this month, they have exceptionally lovely color and excellent crystal forms! We first featured vesuvianite from this classic locality in March 2000, and are thrilled to have gotten another large lot of beautiful pieces! Our write-up explains the unusual metamorphic origin of vesuvianite and its use as a gemstone, along with the facts and fiction surrounding asbestos and the rich history of what was once the world’s largest asbestos mine--the Jeffrey Mine in Canada! 

 

Would you like to start your membership with January's mineral and include all the minerals we've featured so far this year? Then choose one of these memberships:

1 Year Gold-Level membership starting with January 2011 for $291.50 (12 months for the price of 11)

1 Year Silver-Level membership starting with January 2011 for $88 (12 months for the price of 11)

Click here if for a price for all the featured minerals from 2011 in Platinum-level size

Click here if for a price for all the featured minerals from 2010 in Platinum-level size

Click here if for a price for all the featured minerals from 2009 in Platinum-level size

Click here to see a brief video of all twelve minerals we featured in 2009: 2009 Featured Minerals

STILL AVAILABLE: APRIL 2010 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: TOPAZ

April 2010 Topaz, Maynard's Claim, Thomas Range, Juab County, Utah. This was another outstanding month! “I pulled out a section of brush and there, stuck to the roots, were two rather large, perfectly flawless topaz crystals. Thus began the most exciting mineral collecting adventure of my life.” Our 10-page Topaz write-up explains why a graduate student made this statement in 1973! In a special section, it also explains why commercial mineral collecting is such a risky business. And as always, the write-up discusses in detail topaz' chemical make-up, crystal form, important collecting sites, gem use. history, and lore, and much more.

And remember, store your topaz crystal away from sunlight to preserve its color!

Gold-level specimens are about 1" to 1.5" long
Silver-level specimens are about ¼" long Platinum-level specimens are available as single crystals or crystals on matrix

Click here to see photos of Platinum-level specimens

Would you like to start your membership with January's mineral and include all the minerals we've featured so far this year? Then choose one of these memberships:

1 Year Gold-Level membership starting with January 2012 for $291.50 (12 months for the price of 11)

1 Year Silver-Level membership starting with January 2012 for $88 (12 months for the price of 11)

Click here if for a price for all the featured minerals from 2011 in Platinum-level size

Click here if for a price for all the featured minerals from 2010 in Platinum-level size

Click here if for a price for all the featured minerals from 2009 in Platinum-level size

 

JANUARY 2012 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: STILBITE-CA

Stilbite-Ca
Jalgaon District
Maharashtra
India
JANUARY 2012 STILBITE-CA Our stilbite-Ca specimens were collected at basalt quarries in the Jalgaon District in the state of Maharashtra in the Republic of India. Jalgaon is located within the Deccan Traps, a huge volcanic province that formed some 65 million years ago and consists of basalt formations as thick as 6,000 feet. Our specimens were extracted from vesicles that formed from gas bubbles in the original magma. Later, these cavities filled with mineral-rich groundwater that precipitated crystals of quartz, calcite, and various zeolite minerals. Basalt quarrying is an important industry throughout the Deccan Traps region of India. Crushed basalt is used as ballast and fill for roads, rail beds, foundations for buildings and dams, and cement additives. Our stilbite-Ca specimens were recovered by professional specimen miners who contract with quarry managers for permission to extract zeolite specimens when they are exposed by quarrying operations.
STILL AVAILABLE

Carnelian, Amberjeby, near the seaport city of Mahajanga in the Boeny Region of northeast Madagascar.

DECEMBER 2011 CARNELIAN Our Gold- and Platinum-level specimens are from the Amberjeby quarry, in a formation of heavily weathered, volcanic rock. When this rock was emplaced, it contained numerous barren vesicles that later filled with groundwater solutions rich in silica and hematite. These solutions eventually formed silica gels that solidified into the reddish carnelian variety of microcrystalline quartz. As erosion and weathering reduced the basalt formations into a coarse earth and gravel, the harder, more resistant carnelian survived as nodules dispersed through the sediments. Mining is conducted mainly by shallow digging, with blasting employed only when necessary. For the first time in many years, Silver-level specimens are from a different locality--the Bobonong District, Central District, Botswana. 
STILL AVAILABLE! NOVEMBER 2011 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: ATACAMITE
Atacamite
Mt. Gunson
Stuart Shelf area of the
Andamooka Ranges-Lake Torrens Region
South Australia, Australia
NOVEMBER 2011 ATACAMITE  A brief portion of the write-up on Atacamite that Club members will receive with their specimen: "Copper ore was discovered at Mt. Gunson in 1875; production began in 1899 from an open pit called the Main Open Cut. Production increased sharply during World War II to help satisfy the critical Allied demand for copper. Mt. Gunson shut down after the war as ore grades and metal prices declined. The mine reopened in 1970 on a larger scale with a new flotation-separation concentrator to treat lower-grade ores. In 1974, the Cattlegrid Deposit, the source of our specimens, opened adjacent to the Main Open Cut. By the time the Cattlegrid Pit shut down in 1986, it had produced 7.2 million metric tons of ore grading 1.9 percent copper that yielded 127,000 metric tons of copper and 62 metric tons (more than 1.9 million troy ounces) of silver. The Mt. Gunson copper deposit lies within a rift valley and is part of South Australia’s Stuart Shelf-Adelaide Geosyncline Copper Province. These copper deposits formed early in the Proterozoic Eon some 1.5 billion years ago when copper-rich hydrothermal solutions surged upward from basement rock into an overlying formation of layered sediments that is now known as the Stuart Shelf. Atacamite formed when shallow deposits of copper-sulfide minerals oxidized in the presence of chlorine ions from saline lake-bed evaporite minerals. Current geological exploration has revealed a massive ore body grading almost three percent copper along with lesser amounts of silver, lead, zinc, and bismuth. Full-scale mining at Mt. Gunson will resume in 2014."  The full write-up contains much more fascinating information!
 
STILL AVAILABLE! OCTOBER 2011 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: BARITE
Two photos representing typical Gold-level specimens that Club members will receive. Click here to see photos of the Platinum-level barites: (Coming soon)
Barite
Cerro Huarihuyn
Miraflores District
Huamalies Province
Huanuco Department, Peru

Our barite specimens were collected at Cerro Huarihuyn (also spelled Warihuayin) in the Miraflores District, Huamalíes Province, Huánuco Department, Peru. Located in central Peru, the remote Miraflores District covers 1,214 square miles and has 3,700 residents and an average elevation of 8,000 feet. It is 200 air miles north-northeast of the national capital of Lima and 125 air miles east of the Pacific coast. Miraflores is not a major mining district, but is rather one of many lesser-mineralized areas of the greater Andes region. Spanish prospectors first visited what is now the Miraflores District in the late 1500s, discovering mineralized outcrops that were of insufficient size and richness to warrant mining. Our barite specimens were collected at Cerro Huarihuyn (Huarihuyn Mountain), an 8,835-foot-high mountain that is really a “hill” by Andean standards. Barite specimens from Cerro Huarihuyn first reached international markets in the late 1990s, but attracted little interest. Then in spring 2005, barite specimens (including ours) with water-clear transparency and superb crystal development were collected in quantity.

STILL AVAILABLE: SEPTEMBER 2011 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: ANHYDRITE

Photo by Jeff Scovil

Anhydrite
Naica Mine
Naica
Municipio de Saucillo
Chihuahua, Mexico
SEPTEMBER 2011 ANHYDRITE Our specimens are from the Naica Mine at Naica, Municipo de Saucillo, Chihuahua, Mexico, an area that is 230 miles south of El Paso, Texas. Spanish prospectors discovered the Naica multi-metal deposit in 1794 and mined it for silver. The Naica Mine has operated more-or-less steadily for more than 200 years and produces lead, zinc, and smaller amounts of silver, copper, and gold. Its historic production exceeds 40 million tons of ore. Naica is Mexico’s oldest producing mine, its leading source of lead, and southern Chihuahua’s biggest private employer. Naica first became recognized in the 1970s as a source of mineral specimens, initially for crystals of fluorite and pyrite. In 1981, miners blasted into a fault that was lined with thousands of flat, square-terminated, pale, blue-gray anhydrite crystals that established Naica as a classic locality for anhydrite. In 2000, Naica miners discovered a natural geodic (geode-like) cave now known as La Cueva de los Cristales Gigantes (the Cave of the Giant Crystals). Our write-up includes a special section on this amazing discovery!
STILL AVAILABLE: AUGUST 2011 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: DOLOMITE

Dolomite
Shangbao Pyrite Mine
Leiyang County
Hengyang Prefecture
Hunan Province, China
AUGUST 2011 DOLOMITE Our dolomite specimens are from the Shangbao Pyrite Mine in Leiyang County, Hengyang Prefecture, Hunan Province, People’s Republic of China. The Shangbao Pyrite Mine is located 15 miles southeast of the city of Leiyang in a historic iron-mining region. In 1972, several small, iron-sulfur mines were consolidated into the Shangbao Pyrite Mine, which used a combination of open-pit and underground mining methods to extract pyrite ore as a source of both iron and sulfur. Shangbao exploits a skarn-type pyrite deposit that formed through the contact metamorphism of limestone and dolomitic limestone. Mineral specimens from the Shangbao Pyrite Mine first reached international markets in the 1980s. When Shangbao ceased commercial operations in 1995, it was one of the world’s few remaining mines that still exploited pyrite as a source of iron. Immediately after the mine closed, a group of former pyrite miners formed a syndicate and leased parts of the mine specifically to collect specimens. Our specimens were recovered from a skarn pocket that was opened in 2008. The write-up you will receive with your dolomite specimen will have lots more information, including a special section on the unique element magnesium.
STILL AVAILABLE: JULY 2011 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: AQUAMARINE

Aquamarine
Erongo Mountain
Usakos and Omaruru Districts
Erongo Region, Namibia

JULY 2011 AQUAMARINE For the second month in a row, we're featuring well-formed crystals collected in dangerous conditions from pockets of sheer cliffs in a South African country! Our aquamarine specimens were collected at Erongo Mountain in the Usakos and Omaruru districts, Erongo Region, Namibia. Erongo Mountain, a prominent, semicircular mountain 18 miles in diameter, is located in west-central Namibia about 125 miles northwest of the national capital of Windhoek. The origin of our specimens goes back 135 million years ago to the late Jurassic Period when a volcanic system subsided and collapsed to form a caldera. This fractured caldera was then intruded by magma that emplaced the alkaline (silica-poor) Erongo granite formation. This intrusion solidified very slowly, leaving pockets of residual magma that were enriched with such unusual elements as tin, tungsten, boron, fluorine, and beryllium. In areas where gases created cavities, final solidification of the residual magma took place on a mineral-by-mineral basis with the growth of large, well-developed crystals. The write-up you will receive with your aquamarine crystal will have lots more information, including a special section on the unique element berylium. Because of their rarity and value, the aquamarine crystals are smaller than what we typically send Gold- and Platinum-level members.

And we still have some left of the long, thin, lustrous black blades of aegirine from Mount Malosa, Zomba District, Malawi, that we featured in June. Why not get a membership that is retroactive to January 2011 and get all the marvelous minerals and fascinating write-ups we have so far this year?

1 Year Gold-Level membership starting with January 2011 for $291.50 (12 months for the price of 11)

1 Year Silver-Level membership starting with January 2011 for $88 (12 months for the price of 11)

STILL AVAILABLE: MAY 2011 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: RHODONITE

Rhodonite
San Martín Mine
Huallanca
Bolognesi Province
Ancash Department, Peru

We are very excited about the gorgeous specimens we will be sending you in May! And we are not exaggerating--the May-June 2007 Mineralogical Record calls these "Gorgeously deep pink aggregates of bladed rhodonite crystals." Since these are exceptional, gorgeous, and rare, they are especially valuable--and as a result, our specimens on all levels will be significantly smaller than usual. If you are a Silver- or Gold-level member who is interested in obtaining a Platinum-level specimen on a one-time basis, please let us know, and we'll forward you a copy of the Email we send to Platinum members with sizes, prices, and photos of our best pieces.

Our rhodonite specimens were collected at the San Martín Mine at Chiurucu, Huallanca District, Bolognesi Province, Ancash Department, Peru. Huallanca District, with an average elevation of 6,000 feet and covering 337 square miles, is 80 miles east of the Pacific Coast and 125 miles north-northeast of the national capital of Lima. Local mineralization was emplaced following the crustal fracturing that accompanied the uplift of the Andes some 60 million years ago. Mineral-rich, hydrothermal solutions surged upward in multiple phases into fractures within quartz-monzonite and granitic country rock to precipitate an array of minerals in complex vein systems. Both the Incas and the colonial Spanish mined silver at Huallanca. Zinc mining became prominent at Huallanca in the 1960s when several underground mines were developed, including the San Martín Mine, a small, multi-metal operation that produces zinc and lesser amounts of silver, lead, and copper. Crystals of rhodonite, a gangue mineral at the San Martín Mine, gained popularity with collectors in the early 1990s. Miners found major rhodonite pockets in 1991, 1995, and 1997, and again in 2007 when our specimens were collected. The San Martín Mine has since closed and is unlikely to reopen. The write-up we will be sending along with the beautiful rhodonite specimens contains much additional information, including a special section on "Decorative Stones" like rhodonite.

STILL AVAILABLE: FEBRUARY 2011 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: AZURITE

Azurite
Morenci Mine
Greenlee County, Arizona

We're very excited about this month! We're featuring azurite, a colorful, hydrous copper carbonate from Arizona’s famed Morenci Mine. Our write-up explains azurite’s mineralogy, its use as both an ornamental stone and an early ore of copper, and the history and technological development of one of the world’s greatest copper mines.

STILL AVAILABLE: JANUARY 2011 MINERAL OF THE MONTH: SCOLECITE

Scolecite
Sangamner
Ahmadnagar District
Maharashtra, India

January 2011 This month’s mineral is an uncommon zeolite group mineral from India that can forms delicate, lovely, colorless-to-white blades, as seen in the photo above These long, thin crystals are an external manifestation of the internal structure of the long, aluminosilicate chains that comprise scolecite, as our write-up discusses. It also explains scolecite's origin as a secondary mineral in volcanic host rocks, the difficulty of collecting this fragile mineral, the unusual properties of the zeolite-group minerals, and why mineralogists recently revised the system of zeolite classification and nomenclature. 

Would you like to start your membership with January's mineral and include all the minerals we've featured so far this year? Then choose one of these memberships:

1 Year Gold-Level membership starting with January 2011 for $291.50 (12 months for the price of 11)

1 Year Silver-Level membership starting with January 2011 for $88 (12 months for the price of 11)

Click here if for a price for all the featured minerals from 2009 in Platinum-level size

Click here to see photos of Platinum-level specimens

Would you like to start your membership with January's mineral and include all the minerals we've featured so far this year? Then choose one of these memberships:

1 Year Gold-Level membership starting with January 2012 for $291.50 (12 months for the price of 11)

1 Year Silver-Level membership starting with January 2012 for $88 (12 months for the price of 11)

Click here if for a price for all the featured minerals from 2011 in Platinum-level size

Click here if for a price for all the featured minerals from 2010 in Platinum-level size

Click here if for a price for all the featured minerals from 2009 in Platinum-level size

 

 
 

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